Leading a happy life with canine epilepsy14 January 2016
DO'S AND DON'TS

THE DO'S

DO be positive. Most dogs with epilepsy live long and happy lives with their owners

DO contact your vet if you are at all concerned about your dog

DO contact the vet immediately if a seizure continues for more than five minutes

DO contact the vet immediately if your dog has repeated seizures, one after the other

DO call the vet first, before taking your dog to the surgery

DO time how long your dog’s seizures last and record them in a seizure diary

DO  film your dog’s seizures and show them to your vet 

DO take your dog for routine check-ups

DO speak to your vet about the best way to manage your dog’s epilepsy

DO try and make sure that your dog is not in a position to injure themselves if you think that your dog is going to have a seizure, by removing coffee tables or closing baby gates

DO remove as many sensory stimuli as possible if you think your dog is going to have a seizure, such as turning the television off and turning down the lights

DO keep an eye on your dog when it is recovering from a seizure, particularly if there are other pets or children around

DO talk about your dog’s epilepsy with friends and family so that they know what to do if they experience your dog having a seizure

THE DONT'S

DON'T forget to give your dog its medication regularly, at the same time each day

DON'T ever change your dog’s medication without speaking to your vet first

DON'T stop, switch, increase or reduce medication without speaking to your vet first

DON'T give your dog additional medication without speaking to your vet first

DON'T take your dog to the vet immediately after a regular seizure, it is better that they recover quietly at home - if you are unsure what to do call your vet for advice

DON'T put your hand near your dog’s mouth while it is having a seizure. It is not in control of its muscles and is likely to bite you